Calls in Linux

I am new to Linux, in fact, I have never used it. I have used computers, and understand the hardware pretty well. So, why shouldn't I be able to use Linux as an OS? my understanding sayes it's a command driven OS like DOS, but not the same commands. Okay, but all the research I do turns up millions of functions that appear to be some massive class library for C++. I only used like 3 commands in DOS. D:(drive), dir, and copy. If I can install a kernal, and somehow get all the drivers that go to it installed. Then install a windows maneger and a desktop, will I be alright?

Comments

  • : I am new to Linux, in fact, I have never used it. I have used computers, and understand the hardware pretty well. So, why shouldn't I be able to use Linux as an OS? my understanding sayes it's a command driven OS like DOS, but not the same commands. Okay, but all the research I do turns up millions of functions that appear to be some massive class library for C++. I only used like 3 commands in DOS. D:(drive), dir, and copy. If I can install a kernal, and somehow get all the drivers that go to it installed. Then install a windows maneger and a desktop, will I be alright?
    :















    You should install Red Het linux with kernal and four shell

  • : : I am new to Linux, in fact, I have never used it. I have used computers, and understand the hardware pretty well. So, why shouldn't I be able to use Linux as an OS? my understanding sayes it's a command driven OS like DOS, but not the same commands. Okay, but all the research I do turns up millions of functions that appear to be some massive class library for C++. I only used like 3 commands in DOS. D:(drive), dir, and copy. If I can install a kernal, and somehow get all the drivers that go to it installed. Then install a windows maneger and a desktop, will I be alright?

    Linux is basically a command line driven operating system. This stems back to the days when UNIX was used a lot (since Linux is a derivative of UNIX), and when the hardware could not support fancy graphics.

    The 'millions of functions' which you find are basically the system call interface which C programmers use to interface with the kernel. Unless you are going to be doing some hardcore low level system programming, then a lot of the time you will not need them.

    When you start learning about the command line, start off with simple things such as copying, moving and deleting files. Then move onto more advanced stuff, such as searching files for regular expressions with grep. After that you may want to look at some of the system administration and network commands.

    Linux is far better than DOS, in that not only are there more commands that do more things, but also the shell scripting language dwarfs the crummy window batch file thingy.

    Installing Linux in the way that you suggested can be difficult for experienced users at time who are comfortable with the shell. I would instead recommend that you get a pre-built system, such as Fedora Core, Mandriva, SuSE, Ubuntu or similar (check out distrowatch.org for this).

    This will enable you to install linux in an easy way, so that you can learn the OS more easily (without being put off by a frustrating install using arcane commands which you may never have heard of before).

    A prebuilt distro will also provide you with all of the packages and window managers that you would want to use.

    However, if you REALLY REALLY want to try and install from scratch, then check out the Linux From Scratch project.

    http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

    Hope this helps,

    ITA
    "Let us smite the evil slime eating hordes who may befall us on our quest to be the ultimate programmers of the known universe!"

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