IDEs

I installed the Java platform SDK, and I am runnig Netbeans as my IDE. It looks very complicated program to use and takes time to learn? Do I have to learn this IDE inside out or what?

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  • : I installed the Java platform SDK, and I am runnig Netbeans as my IDE. It looks very complicated program to use and takes time to learn? Do I have to learn this IDE inside out or what?
    :

    Well I guess you have to learn at least 1 IDE since they make your life more easy :) Personally I like to use Eclipse.
    But you can always use notepad or VI to create your source files but I recon you'll find an IDE much more easy to use!
  • : I installed the Java platform SDK, and I am runnig Netbeans as my IDE. It looks very complicated program to use and takes time to learn? Do I have to learn this IDE inside out or what?
    :
    I use CPad, it is great. very easy, you have to know how to setup the compiler (not hard) inside whichever IDE you use. Stay away from GUI designers like netbeans. netbeans is buggy anyway, I found it useless.

    DV

    Data Virtue
    Sean anderson
  • : : I installed the Java platform SDK, and I am runnig Netbeans as my IDE. It looks very complicated program to use and takes time to learn? Do I have to learn this IDE inside out or what?
    : :
    : I use CPad, it is great. very easy, you have to know how to setup the compiler (not hard) inside whichever IDE you use. Stay away from GUI designers like netbeans. netbeans is buggy anyway, I found it useless.
    :
    : DV
    :
    : Data Virtue
    : Sean anderson
    :

    Hello, I've been developing with java for over a year now at College and I've used a few things. I've also been doing some scripting on the side with unreal tournament, and they suggest using Text Pad, which I found works great, so you could even use that for your source editing needs :)

    At school we were taught on JBuilder 3 which doesn't have a GUI editor built in so you've got to do that all manually, a great way to teach, but this program doesn't have the "intellisense" aid that I've found extremely nice. I then took on a major project and developed it under J# which is part of the Microsoft Development Environment (.Net 2003). I love being able to drag and drop my interfaces and not have to worry about doing all the configuration manually which can take up a lot of time. I like being able to do that quickly and then put in more time to the actually programs inner workings.

    So in summation, I totally recommend using an IDE like NetBeans (only played around with it, haven't done any major development) or even the latest release of JBuilder (JBuilder X I think...) - and if you're really feeling ballsy, dive into J# it's not too difficult to get your head around :)

    Enjoy,

    -Dan
  • : I installed the Java platform SDK, and I am runnig Netbeans as my IDE. It looks very complicated program to use and takes time to learn? Do I have to learn this IDE inside out or what?
    :


    There are many IDE which are best for different purposes

    Well to start with if you are a starter I would suggest a simple editor like Textpad because you will learn many things there because the IDE itself does not give you all these popups and context sensitive help.

    And if you want to dvelope high volumes of code, go for IDE's like Netbeans or Eclipse. These two are equally rated by many surveys.Both give auto completions of code,code folding etc.
    Netbeans gives you GUI editing and features like direct integration with Sun's App Servers(Many other products from Sun), Tomcat etc. But that is realy heavy.
    Eclipse on the other hand is light and there are many plugins that give you integration of the IDE with many other applications.Because of this it is faster than Netbeans.

    All these are freeware. If you can spend money on IDE IntelliJ Idea is rated as the best IDE(evn I havn't tried it).





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