WAVE Uncompressor?

Hi,

The Sound SDK I'm using only accepts WAVE files if they're in uncompressed format. Almost every single sound editing program saves them as compressed, though. Does anybody know of any programs that will convert waves to uncompressed format? I don't want to spend much money, so freeware apps would be greatly preferred. I just need a WAV decompressor. Anybody know of one?



Thanks,

Ishamael




Comments

  • Ishamael,



    What format are your compressed WAVE files in?



    Also, give Acoustica 2.1 a try (http://www.aconas.de) -- it's a shareware program that will save files in straight PCM.



    -Rich



    : Hi,

    : The Sound SDK I'm using only accepts WAVE files if they're in uncompressed format. Almost every single sound editing program saves them as compressed, though. Does anybody know of any programs that will convert waves to uncompressed format? I don't want to spend much money, so freeware apps would be greatly preferred. I just need a WAV decompressor. Anybody know of one?

    :

    : Thanks,

    : Ishamael

    :

    :






  • My WAVEs are 16-bit 22.05KHz PCMs, but they are in compressed PCM format. It seems that most sound editing tools save in compressed PCM -- I've tried GoldWave, Windows SoundRec, ASIA, Acoustica, Shuffler Converter, and several others. They all save the WAVEs in compressed PCM format.



    Thanks for your help,

    Ishamael



    : Ishamael,

    :

    : What format are your compressed WAVE files in?

    :

    : Also, give Acoustica 2.1 a try (http://www.aconas.de) -- it's a shareware program that will save files in straight PCM.

    :

    : -Rich


  • Ishamael,



    I wish I was more helpful the last time, but I fear I'm not following you. I thought you meant your wave files were in some compressed format like ADPCM, GSM6.10, etc. In that case, Windows SoundRecorder can convert them to straight PCM.



    I suspect now that you mean something else by the words "compressed PCM format," but I'm afraid I don't know what you mean. For example, if I bring up Windows SoundRecorder, record a few seconds of my voice then choose "Save As...", the dialog box I see shows the format information near the bottom (the default is PCM 22.05 kHz, 8-bit, mono on my system) and offers me a "Change..." button if I wish to modify that format prior to saving to disk. If I save with a PCM format, there's no compression that I'm aware of -- there's only the the standard way PCM data is packed in a RIFF file of type WAVE.



    -Rich



    : My WAVEs are 16-bit 22.05KHz PCMs, but they are in compressed PCM format. It seems that most sound editing tools save in compressed PCM -- I've tried GoldWave, Windows SoundRec, ASIA, Acoustica, Shuffler Converter, and several others. They all save the WAVEs in compressed PCM format.

    :

    : Thanks for your help,

    : Ishamael

    :

    : : Ishamael,

    : :

    : : What format are your compressed WAVE files in?

    : :

    : : Also, give Acoustica 2.1 a try (http://www.aconas.de) -- it's a shareware program that will save files in straight PCM.

    : :

    : : -Rich

    :






  • Sorry if In wasn't making myself clear. I'll try to explain. I guess what I'm looking for is some sort of program that will save my audio files as pure, uncompressed, raw PCM wave data instead of using the RIFF WAV encoding. Somebody from a different messageboard suggested looking for codecs that I could plug into an audio editor that would do that job -- does anybody know of any?



    Thanks for all of your help so far,

    Ishamael



    : Ishamael,

    :

    : I wish I was more helpful the last time, but I fear I'm not following you. I thought you meant your wave files were in some compressed format like ADPCM, GSM6.10, etc. In that case, Windows SoundRecorder can convert them to straight PCM.

    :

    : I suspect now that you mean something else by the words "compressed PCM format," but I'm afraid I don't know what you mean. For example, if I bring up Windows SoundRecorder, record a few seconds of my voice then choose "Save As...", the dialog box I see shows the format information near the bottom (the default is PCM 22.05 kHz, 8-bit, mono on my system) and offers me a "Change..." button if I wish to modify that format prior to saving to disk. If I save with a PCM format, there's no compression that I'm aware of -- there's only the the standard way PCM data is packed in a RIFF file of type WAVE.

    :

    : -Rich


  • Ishamael,



    Now I get it. I think your best bet is to write a little program to strip the PCM data from RIFF WAV files since the audio editor, not the codec, manages the disk I/O, and I expect virtually all of them read and write standard RIFF WAV files (although some may write additional file formats that may be closer to what you'd like).



    You can find sample code on MSDN to read and write RIFF WAV files. I seem to recall that all of your formats are the same in terms of bits per sample, sampling rate, etc., so discarding the format information shouldn't be a problem for you. All you need to do is seek to the data subchunk, read the data length, and then copy that many bytes from the WAV file into another file.



    -Rich



    : Sorry if In wasn't making myself clear. I'll try to explain. I guess what I'm looking for is some sort of program that will save my audio files as pure, uncompressed, raw PCM wave data instead of using the RIFF WAV encoding. Somebody from a different messageboard suggested looking for codecs that I could plug into an audio editor that would do that job -- does anybody know of any?

    :

    : Thanks for all of your help so far,

    : Ishamael

    :

    : : Ishamael,

    : :

    : : I wish I was more helpful the last time, but I fear I'm not following you. I thought you meant your wave files were in some compressed format like ADPCM, GSM6.10, etc. In that case, Windows SoundRecorder can convert them to straight PCM.

    : :

    : : I suspect now that you mean something else by the words "compressed PCM format," but I'm afraid I don't know what you mean. For example, if I bring up Windows SoundRecorder, record a few seconds of my voice then choose "Save As...", the dialog box I see shows the format information near the bottom (the default is PCM 22.05 kHz, 8-bit, mono on my system) and offers me a "Change..." button if I wish to modify that format prior to saving to disk. If I save with a PCM format, there's no compression that I'm aware of -- there's only the the standard way PCM data is packed in a RIFF file of type WAVE.

    : :

    : : -Rich

    :






  • : Ishamael,
    :
    : Now I get it. I think your best bet is to write a little program to strip the PCM data from RIFF WAV files since the audio editor, not the codec, manages the disk I/O, and I expect virtually all of them read and write standard RIFF WAV files (although some may write additional file formats that may be closer to what you'd like).
    :
    : You can find sample code on MSDN to read and write RIFF WAV files. I seem to recall that all of your formats are the same in terms of bits per sample, sampling rate, etc., so discarding the format information shouldn't be a problem for you. All you need to do is seek to the data subchunk, read the data length, and then copy that many bytes from the WAV file into another file.
    :
    : -Rich
    :
    : : Sorry if In wasn't making myself clear. I'll try to explain. I guess what I'm looking for is some sort of program that will save my audio files as pure, uncompressed, raw PCM wave data instead of using the RIFF WAV encoding. Somebody from a different messageboard suggested looking for codecs that I could plug into an audio editor that would do that job -- does anybody know of any?
    : :
    : : Thanks for all of your help so far,
    : : Ishamael
    : :
    : : : Ishamael,
    : : :
    : : : I wish I was more helpful the last time, but I fear I'm not following you. I thought you meant your wave files were in some compressed format like ADPCM, GSM6.10, etc. In that case, Windows SoundRecorder can convert them to straight PCM.
    : : :
    : : : I suspect now that you mean something else by the words "compressed PCM format," but I'm afraid I don't know what you mean. For example, if I bring up Windows SoundRecorder, record a few seconds of my voice then choose "Save As...", the dialog box I see shows the format information near the bottom (the default is PCM 22.05 kHz, 8-bit, mono on my system) and offers me a "Change..." button if I wish to modify that format prior to saving to disk. If I save with a PCM format, there's no compression that I'm aware of -- there's only the the standard way PCM data is packed in a RIFF file of type WAVE.
    : : :
    : : : -Rich
    : :
    :
    :
    :
    CDH MEDIA WIZARD WILL DO THE TRICK<COST $60 TRIAL FOR 30 DAYS


  • : My WAVEs are 16-bit 22.05KHz PCMs, but they are in compressed PCM format. It seems that most sound editing tools save in compressed PCM -- I've tried GoldWave, Windows SoundRec, ASIA, Acoustica, Shuffler Converter, and several others. They all save the WAVEs in compressed PCM format.
    :
    : Thanks for your help,
    : Ishamael
    :
    No they don't. I have used soundrec and goldwave a lot, and the files they produce are plain and not compressed.


  • Goldwave can save wave data without structure. Choose Export and choose the raw format.


  • if all does not work...write a small app to strip the header for you. it shouldn't take more than 2 pages. within the wave file file there is a field that tells you the offset of when the sample data beging relative to the beginning of the file or you could just read in the headers yourself and keep track of it. its better than paying money ;) if you don't know the RIFF WAVE file format i'll be glad to help.

    -lando

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