extended memory access

Virtually all of my professional C programming has been done on 16 bit targets. The targets run the equivelent of DOS 6.22. The latest project uses a Pentium cpu, and the board comes with several megabytes of RAM.

I have never needed anywhere near that amount of RAM for the projects that I do (control systems for automated machinery) but I am curious to know if it is possible to utilize the extended memory for my programs and data. My MCVC v 1.52 compiler has "complained" from time to time about running out of memory, and it is becoming obvious that I will need to learn the techniques for using extended memory.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Comments

  • : Virtually all of my professional C programming has been done on 16 bit targets. The targets run the equivelent of DOS 6.22. The latest project uses a Pentium cpu, and the board comes with several megabytes of RAM.
    :
    : I have never needed anywhere near that amount of RAM for the projects that I do (control systems for automated machinery) but I am curious to know if it is possible to utilize the extended memory for my programs and data. My MCVC v 1.52 compiler has "complained" from time to time about running out of memory, and it is becoming obvious that I will need to learn the techniques for using extended memory.
    :
    : Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    :
    :

    [blue]that compiler has functions that will move data in and out of extended memory. (I don't recall the function names) unless you have a dos extender, 16-bit apps can only access memory in the lower 640K. moving data between lower 640K and extended memory is very very slow because the computer must be switched to procted mode to do it. The functions provided by that compiler will do that for you.[/blue]


  • : : Virtually all of my professional C programming has been done on 16 bit targets. The targets run the equivelent of DOS 6.22. The latest project uses a Pentium cpu, and the board comes with several megabytes of RAM.
    : :
    : : I have never needed anywhere near that amount of RAM for the projects that I do (control systems for automated machinery) but I am curious to know if it is possible to utilize the extended memory for my programs and data. My MCVC v 1.52 compiler has "complained" from time to time about running out of memory, and it is becoming obvious that I will need to learn the techniques for using extended memory.
    : :
    : : Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    : :
    : :
    :
    : [blue]that compiler has functions that will move data in and out of extended memory. (I don't recall the function names) unless you have a dos extender, 16-bit apps can only access memory in the lower 640K. moving data between lower 640K and extended memory is very very slow because the computer must be switched to procted mode to do it. The functions provided by that compiler will do that for you.[/blue]
    :
    :
    :
    [green]So, what is going out of memory? The compiler or your program? Because, if compiler itself is out of memory, then using more memory for the program will not help. What kind of working configuration you have? Which Windows version? How much RAM do you have? How much swapping file size?[/green]
  • : : : Virtually all of my professional C programming has been done on 16 bit targets. The targets run the equivelent of DOS 6.22. The latest project uses a Pentium cpu, and the board comes with several megabytes of RAM.
    : : :
    : : : I have never needed anywhere near that amount of RAM for the projects that I do (control systems for automated machinery) but I am curious to know if it is possible to utilize the extended memory for my programs and data. My MCVC v 1.52 compiler has "complained" from time to time about running out of memory, and it is becoming obvious that I will need to learn the techniques for using extended memory.
    : : :
    : : : Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    : : :
    : : :
    : :
    : : [blue]that compiler has functions that will move data in and out of extended memory. (I don't recall the function names) unless you have a dos extender, 16-bit apps can only access memory in the lower 640K. moving data between lower 640K and extended memory is very very slow because the computer must be switched to procted mode to do it. The functions provided by that compiler will do that for you.[/blue]
    : :
    : :
    : :
    : [green]So, what is going out of memory? The compiler or your program? Because, if compiler itself is out of memory, then using more memory for the program will not help. What kind of working configuration you have? Which Windows version? How much RAM do you have? How much swapping file size?[/green]
    :

    Right now it is the compiler that is having trouble from time to time. So far I don't need more memory for the compiled programs, but had hoped there was an easy way to do this for when I do need extra memory. I am not sure what you mean by working configuration, but for this program the DOS target is a PC-104 card. I believe it is equipped with 15+ megabytes of RAM. The target is not running any sort of windows, nor any sort of utility to swap files.



  • : : : : Virtually all of my professional C programming has been done on 16 bit targets. The targets run the equivelent of DOS 6.22. The latest project uses a Pentium cpu, and the board comes with several megabytes of RAM.
    : : : :
    : : : : I have never needed anywhere near that amount of RAM for the projects that I do (control systems for automated machinery) but I am curious to know if it is possible to utilize the extended memory for my programs and data. My MCVC v 1.52 compiler has "complained" from time to time about running out of memory, and it is becoming obvious that I will need to learn the techniques for using extended memory.
    : : : :
    : : : : Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    : : : :
    : : : :
    : : :
    : : : [blue]that compiler has functions that will move data in and out of extended memory. (I don't recall the function names) unless you have a dos extender, 16-bit apps can only access memory in the lower 640K. moving data between lower 640K and extended memory is very very slow because the computer must be switched to procted mode to do it. The functions provided by that compiler will do that for you.[/blue]
    : : :
    : : :
    : : :
    : : [green]So, what is going out of memory? The compiler or your program? Because, if compiler itself is out of memory, then using more memory for the program will not help. What kind of working configuration you have? Which Windows version? How much RAM do you have? How much swapping file size?[/green]
    : :
    :
    : Right now it is the compiler that is having trouble from time to time. So far I don't need more memory for the compiled programs, but had hoped there was an easy way to do this for when I do need extra memory. I am not sure what you mean by working configuration, but for this program the DOS target is a PC-104 card. I believe it is equipped with 15+ megabytes of RAM. The target is not running any sort of windows, nor any sort of utility to swap files.
    :
    :
    :
    [blue]now I'm confused -- you said originally you needed more memory for your programs and data -- now its for the compiler itself? [/blue]
    :

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