To deal with propertiesof Folders

Hello,
Is it possible to hide a folder without using the default hiding procedure used by windows. I want the effect such that my hidden folder should not be viewed even the "Folder Options" is set view the hidden files and it should not also viewed in COMMAND prompt. I expect the reply very soon.




Comments

  • [green]
    So, you expect a reply soon ? Try deleting the folder ;-).
    [/green]

    [size=2][red]

    [b]Bikram[/b][/red]
    [blue]http://www.geocities.com/nv5050[/blue]
    [red]**************************************[/red][/size]

  • : [green]
    : So, you expect a reply soon ? Try deleting the folder ;-).
    : [/green]
    :
    : [size=2][red]
    :
    : [b]Bikram[/b][/red]
    : [blue]http://www.geocities.com/nv5050[/blue]
    : [red]**************************************[/red][/size]
    :
    :
    Eh, eh !!!

    Sorry, but if ever you could do it (I don't think it can be possible, but pheraps I'm wrong), how would you use that folder, if there is no way of seeing it?

    nICO

    [hr]
    [italic]How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty itself.[/italic]
    JOHN KEATS


  • : Hello,
    : Is it possible to hide a folder without using the default hiding procedure used by windows. I want the effect such that my hidden folder should not be viewed even the "Folder Options" is set view the hidden files and it should not also viewed in COMMAND prompt. I expect the reply very soon.
    :
    :
    :
    :
    :
    Chances are that if the folder can't be viewed on LM, then it can't be accessed either.

    e.g. The remote folder renaming exploit used by pirates for FTP hacking to hide their "stash" from the FTP's Admin.

    To answer you 2nd question: No I will not post that information here.

    Stoic Joker
  • : : Hello,
    : : Is it possible to hide a folder without using the default hiding procedure used by windows. I want the effect such that my hidden folder should not be viewed even the "Folder Options" is set view the hidden files and it should not also viewed in COMMAND prompt. I expect the reply very soon.
    : :
    : :
    : :
    : :
    : :
    : Chances are that if the folder can't be viewed on LM, then it can't be accessed either.
    :
    : e.g. The remote folder renaming exploit used by pirates for FTP hacking to hide their "stash" from the FTP's Admin.
    :
    : To answer you 2nd question: No I will not post that information here.
    :
    : Stoic Joker
    : No my problem is not hiding from the remote systems. I should hide the folder or even the file on the local machine i.e anyone who is using that machine should not aware that there is folder or file.Even if I hide the folder which contain the drivers then after a reboot the OS should not use that drivers. I certainly know that it is possible but I don't know how it is achieved. And Thank You for u'r idea.



  • : : [green]
    : : So, you expect a reply soon ? Try deleting the folder ;-).
    : : [/green]
    : :
    : : [size=2][red]
    : :
    : : [b]Bikram[/b][/red]
    : : [blue]http://www.geocities.com/nv5050[/blue]
    : : [red]**************************************[/red][/size]
    : :
    : :
    : Eh, eh !!!
    :
    : Sorry, but if ever you could do it (I don't think it can be possible, but pheraps I'm wrong), how would you use that folder, if there is no way of seeing it?
    :
    : nICO
    :
    : [hr]
    : [italic]How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty itself.[/italic]
    : JOHN KEATS
    :
    :
    : I don't mean that noone should view that folder. Only my application should hide it. And by reversing the method I should get back the folder and my application will check for the authentication etc.
    Okay.

  • [green]It is possible somewhat, depending on how much effort is worth your while in accomplishing this task. You could, for one, write a file system filter driver or hook into the appropriate API to catch calls destined for a particular folder. Ofcourse, both these require you to use the DDK, but it is not overwhelming to do it.[/green]
    [size=2][red]

    [b]Bikram[/b][/red]
    [blue]http://www.geocities.com/nv5050[/blue]
    [red]**************************************[/red][/size]

  • [b][red]This message was edited by pingpong at 2002-9-17 5:20:10[/red][/b][hr]
    I once did that, mind you on FAT16 and using a 16-bit Windows compiler that had access to int 13h (that was around 1932 or so). That doesnt mean it wont work with 32-compilers and on FAT32 or NTFS. You just need low level disk access (cluster-level) and you are good to go. The info on that I'm sure is on the net, just remember you probably gonna need to versions of your program, one for 9x and one for NT because accessing the clusters using 95/98/ME is completely different than doing it in NT/2K/XP.

    Using the FAT chain and the directory entry for the root of the drive, I reached the directory entry to that particular folder, I signalled it as deleted (if I recall, by putting 0xE5 as the first character in the name), followed the FAT chain from the start cluster till I reached the end cluster, instead of the EOF file marker there, I made it point back to the first cluster. Then I saved the directory entry information along with the address of the changed FAT entry to a file somewhere.

    Now, to the OS, the directory entry is deleted, but the clusters themselves (and hence, your data) are still in use according to the FAT (the chain back trick). Infact, from the OS point of view, you can leave the FAT unchanged and it should work fine, but if you run CHKDSK or ScanDisk on the driver, they will report those clusters as bad and then try to delete them. Having the last entry in your FAT chain point back to the first fools them perfectly.

    Finally, when you want to store everything back, simply manually add the directory entry back to its place, unhook the FAT (remember, all this information was saved to a file somewhere) and you are good to go.



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