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Does anybody use 8052 BASIC?

melissa_may1melissa_may1 Member Posts: 937
I've been going through some stuff that's been packed away, and found an 8052 board that I bought for a project, but never actually used. The 8052 is a microcontroller that uses BASIC as a language. You can compile or run interpretive BASIC, or programm in C or assembly.

So, I've been thinking about working something up with that.

Just wondering if anyone else is doing anything with these?

Melissa.

Comments

  • NeoStriderNeoStrider Member Posts: 4
    : I've been going through some stuff that's been packed away, and found an 8052 board that I bought for a project, but never actually used. The 8052 is a microcontroller that uses BASIC as a language. You can compile or run interpretive BASIC, or programm in C or assembly.
    :
    : So, I've been thinking about working something up with that.
    :
    : Just wondering if anyone else is doing anything with these?
    :
    : Melissa.
    :
    Ok,
    What is a microcontroller?




  • billywm664billywm664 Member Posts: 176
    I ususally don't have money to blow on things like that. I did use a 'basic stamp' in electronics class 2 years ago. It was pretty cool. And for the person who asked what a microcontroller is.... um, don't really know how to explain it, but look at this:
    http://stampsinclass.com/

    the 'BASIC Stamp' is a microcontroller. I mean, a microcontroller is kind of like what is sounds like.

    : I've been going through some stuff that's been packed away, and found an 8052 board that I bought for a project, but never actually used. The 8052 is a microcontroller that uses BASIC as a language. You can compile or run interpretive BASIC, or programm in C or assembly.
    :
    : So, I've been thinking about working something up with that.
    :
    : Just wondering if anyone else is doing anything with these?
    :
    : Melissa.
    :


  • melissa_may1melissa_may1 Member Posts: 937
    A microcontroller is similar to a microprocessor, except that it is dedicated to running a specific program (usually stored in ROM), is low-cost, low-power, and is "imbedded" in a device.

    So, a cell-phone, a VCR, a microwave oven, even some refrigerators contain a microcontroller used to control its operation.

    The first in the series was from Intel, the 8051. They are now manufactured, in many variants, by dozens of companies.

    [code]
    A typical 8051 contains:
    - CPU with boolean processor
    - 5 or 6 interrupts: 2 are external
    2 priority levels
    - 2 or 3 16-bit timer/counters
    - programmable full-duplex serial port
    (baud rate provided by one of the timers)
    - 32 I/O lines (four 8-bit ports)
    - RAM
    - ROM/EPROM in some models
    [/code]
    There are many variations, among which (from Intel with prices in US$):
    [code]
    8031 (128 bytes RAM).............................$3.59
    80C31 (CMOS version of previous).................$6.95
    8051AH (256 bytes RAM)...........................$6.95
    8051AHBASIC (w/Basic interpreter built in)......$29.95
    8751 (4K EPROM, 128 bytes RAM)..................$26.95
    87C51 (CMOS version of previous)................$39.95
    [/code]

    There is an excellent introduction to microcontrollers at:
    http://www.howstuffworks.com/microcontroller.htm

    There's also a great FAQ at (among many,many other places):
    http://www.cs.ruu.nl/wais/html/na-dir/microcontroller-faq/8051.html

    :


  • NeoStriderNeoStrider Member Posts: 4
    : A microcontroller is similar to a microprocessor, except that it is dedicated to running a specific program (usually stored in ROM), is low-cost, low-power, and is "imbedded" in a device.
    :
    : So, a cell-phone, a VCR, a microwave oven, even some refrigerators contain a microcontroller used to control its operation.
    :
    : The first in the series was from Intel, the 8051. They are now manufactured, in many variants, by dozens of companies.
    :
    : [code]
    : A typical 8051 contains:
    : - CPU with boolean processor
    : - 5 or 6 interrupts: 2 are external
    : 2 priority levels
    : - 2 or 3 16-bit timer/counters
    : - programmable full-duplex serial port
    : (baud rate provided by one of the timers)
    : - 32 I/O lines (four 8-bit ports)
    : - RAM
    : - ROM/EPROM in some models
    : [/code]
    : There are many variations, among which (from Intel with prices in US$):
    : [code]
    : 8031 (128 bytes RAM).............................$3.59
    : 80C31 (CMOS version of previous).................$6.95
    : 8051AH (256 bytes RAM)...........................$6.95
    : 8051AHBASIC (w/Basic interpreter built in)......$29.95
    : 8751 (4K EPROM, 128 bytes RAM)..................$26.95
    : 87C51 (CMOS version of previous)................$39.95
    : [/code]
    :
    : There is an excellent introduction to microcontrollers at:
    : http://www.howstuffworks.com/microcontroller.htm
    :
    : There's also a great FAQ at (among many,many other places):
    : http://www.cs.ruu.nl/wais/html/na-dir/microcontroller-faq/8051.html
    :
    : :
    :
    :


  • NeoStriderNeoStrider Member Posts: 4
    : A microcontroller is similar to a microprocessor, except that it is dedicated to running a specific program (usually stored in ROM), is low-cost, low-power, and is "imbedded" in a device.
    :
    : So, a cell-phone, a VCR, a microwave oven, even some refrigerators contain a microcontroller used to control its operation.
    :
    : The first in the series was from Intel, the 8051. They are now manufactured, in many variants, by dozens of companies.
    :
    : [code]
    : A typical 8051 contains:
    : - CPU with boolean processor
    : - 5 or 6 interrupts: 2 are external
    : 2 priority levels
    : - 2 or 3 16-bit timer/counters
    : - programmable full-duplex serial port
    : (baud rate provided by one of the timers)
    : - 32 I/O lines (four 8-bit ports)
    : - RAM
    : - ROM/EPROM in some models
    : [/code]
    : There are many variations, among which (from Intel with prices in US$):
    : [code]
    : 8031 (128 bytes RAM).............................$3.59
    : 80C31 (CMOS version of previous).................$6.95
    : 8051AH (256 bytes RAM)...........................$6.95
    : 8051AHBASIC (w/Basic interpreter built in)......$29.95
    : 8751 (4K EPROM, 128 bytes RAM)..................$26.95
    : 87C51 (CMOS version of previous)................$39.95
    : [/code]
    :
    : There is an excellent introduction to microcontrollers at:
    : http://www.howstuffworks.com/microcontroller.htm
    :
    : There's also a great FAQ at (among many,many other places):
    : http://www.cs.ruu.nl/wais/html/na-dir/microcontroller-faq/8051.html
    :
    : :
    :
    :
    Cool!
    How can I start programming Microcontrollers?

  • melissa_may1melissa_may1 Member Posts: 937
    : Cool!
    : How can I start programming Microcontrollers?
    :

    There are some free BASIC compilers around (search the web), as well as assemblers, and C compilers. Actually, these are cross-compilers, since they run on a PC, and produce 8051 code.

    Then, you'll need to run it on an 8051. But there's another fast, cheap way, and that's to use a simulator. A simulator runs on a PC, and executes 8051 code. It outputs on the screen.

    It's limited to what you can do, since you can't add hardware to it. But it's a good way to get started, and to see if you want to do more.

    Check out www.8051.com. Search the web for '8051 AND microcontroller

    Melissa

  • alan_pollockalan_pollock Member Posts: 110
    Hey guys/gals,

    Sorry I've been away so long, bad things afoot around here. I've been so busy lately running around (like a chicken with its head cut off), because of a severe illness in the family... but I'm back.

    Years ago I used to develop in an HP environment, HP-1000C to be exact (using Fortran and HP Macro Assembler)... I had a project which involved interfacing a Perkin-Elmer spectrography machine to the HP. The PE was a complicated piece of equipment, but it used an interface board which had on-board Basic... a microcontroller. This add on board fits the description of what Melissa is talking about, but I can't remember for sure if it's the same one.

    While the PE itself was capable of analyzing and storing its results, the process could be automated via this Basic programmable interface and the input and output results piped out through the card's serial port (which is how we got the results to the HP). You would need to know how one of these machines works to understand what I'm talking about... preparing and running an analysis sample required the pushing of a lot of buttons (per say), and all of these actions where what was programmed and automated (insert sample, run program).

    As for the Basic command set used, it was rudimentary. All things considered, an expansive command set wasn't required - just the ability to access and control I/O ports.



    : I ususally don't have money to blow on things like that. I did use a 'basic stamp' in electronics class 2 years ago. It was pretty cool. And for the person who asked what a microcontroller is.... um, don't really know how to explain it, but look at this:
    : http://stampsinclass.com/
    :
    : the 'BASIC Stamp' is a microcontroller. I mean, a microcontroller is kind of like what is sounds like.
    :
    : : I've been going through some stuff that's been packed away, and found an 8052 board that I bought for a project, but never actually used. The 8052 is a microcontroller that uses BASIC as a language. You can compile or run interpretive BASIC, or programm in C or assembly.
    : :
    : : So, I've been thinking about working something up with that.
    : :
    : : Just wondering if anyone else is doing anything with these?
    : :
    : : Melissa.
    : :
    :
    :


  • alan_pollockalan_pollock Member Posts: 110
    Hey guys/gals,

    Sorry I've been away so long, bad things afoot around here. I've been so busy lately running around (like a chicken with its head cut off), because of a severe illness in the family... but I'm back.

    Years ago I used to develop in an HP environment, HP-1000C to be exact (using Fortran and HP Macro Assembler)... I had a project which involved interfacing a Perkin-Elmer spectrography machine to the HP. The PE was a complicated piece of equipment, but it used an interface board which had on-board Basic... a microcontroller. This add on board fits the description of what Melissa is talking about, but I can't remember for sure if it's the same one.

    While the PE itself was capable of analyzing and storing its results, the process could be automated via this Basic programmable interface and the input and output results piped out through the card's serial port (which is how we got the results to the HP). You would need to know how one of these machines works to understand what I'm talking about... preparing and running an analysis sample required the pushing of a lot of buttons (per say), and all of these actions where what was programmed and automated (insert sample, run program).

    As for the Basic command set used, it was rudimentary. All things considered, an expansive command set wasn't required - just the ability to access and control I/O ports.



    : I ususally don't have money to blow on things like that. I did use a 'basic stamp' in electronics class 2 years ago. It was pretty cool. And for the person who asked what a microcontroller is.... um, don't really know how to explain it, but look at this:
    : http://stampsinclass.com/
    :
    : the 'BASIC Stamp' is a microcontroller. I mean, a microcontroller is kind of like what is sounds like.
    :
    : : I've been going through some stuff that's been packed away, and found an 8052 board that I bought for a project, but never actually used. The 8052 is a microcontroller that uses BASIC as a language. You can compile or run interpretive BASIC, or programm in C or assembly.
    : :
    : : So, I've been thinking about working something up with that.
    : :
    : : Just wondering if anyone else is doing anything with these?
    : :
    : : Melissa.
    : :
    :
    :


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