Why can't I get it?

I'M just 23 to start, but I've been into programming since my early teens and I'M still no good. I first got into C++ because I wanted to learn how to make video games. Not that that's no longer an issue, but now I just want a job that's not in a factory. I'M now trying to learn C#, but just like C++, once I get so far into learning, things start to get to confusing. I can get basic input/output, if/else statements, loops, you know, the simple stuff. But beyond that, I get stuck. I'M a single parent so going back to School isn't really an option. Is there any way I can learn to program? Am I learning on the wrong languages? And is there anyway I could get a job programming without a degree? Thanks for any and all replies.

Comments

  • it sounds like you have picked up linear programming but haven't dug into OOP (Object Oriented Programming).

    Learn about classes and why they are usefull. Pick up a book or find some online articles on how to begin thinking abstractly when you write code.

    Pick a language that you can learn on and commit to some small projects from beginning to end - even if you just have to make up something yourself. Find something you do every day that could benefit from some kind of automation you could write.

    Then post your results on an active forum or something and challenge other coders to show you how to do it better. - if you don't understand what they did, ask for explanations - or google search the heck out of it.

    Google btw is the smartest programmer on the plannet...

    If you are starting off with microsoft compilers, use their various project wizards and then look at the code that is generated by them. Understand what they are doing, and then start trying to recreate the generated code on your own.

    If you are getting into something like C++ or C#, you need to really start learning about their libraries also. This is especially important with the .NET languages because they are all about their frameworks and libraries.

    Learn about Generics, Reflection, Type Conversion, and Dependency Injection as concepts

    Dive under the hood of what Assemblies really are - look up Intermediate Language (IL) - Download RedHat's Reflector and decompile some .NET applications to see how some finished projects are tied together.

    As you go along post your questions in the forum here for the language you are using.

    Get some OJT - find a simple job - start as an assistant or something so you are surrounded by people that really know what they are doing and you always have someone to ask questions of.

    that was my journey anyways (give or take). It's different for everyone.
    ><//~Psightoplasm`~
  • learn algorithms

    will make your programming life easier


    I am in relearning process, sorry if i make a mistake
  • I would say this is because most tutorials and books are no good.
    And those that create them would rather tell you that you are no good at programming then to admit that their tutorials suck.

    Whenever I want to learn something I need to Google for weeks going through horrible tutorials and often being on the verge of giving up.
    Then when I finally manage to understand it I found out that their tutorial which was few pages long could have been written into only few lines withouth extra "fluf".

    Also most programming languages are mess which is why there are so many of them someone always trying to create new language to fix what was wrong with previous language. C and C++ are extremely hard to use because of pointers. C# syntax is much more complex then JAVA. Microsoft Wizard generated code to me was always useless for learning since it would always generate pages upon pages of code where similar JAVA wizard would give you few lines of pure JAVA syntax.

    And once you learn the syntax you are just at the begining.
    Now you need to learn 100 different APIs which do the same thing, 100 different frameworks which do the same think, 100 different editors which do the same think.

    And once you learn all that you can simply forget it all and start from scratch to learn some new language which is "improvement" to all existing once or your manager will simply tell you to do so because of project needs.

    Well at least this is what I think. :)
  • C and C++ are pretty figure

    if you want to learn how to program I recommend python, perl, and php.

    basic start out with python you don't have to worry about types. perl and php are pretty easy to step into, after a few hours of python.

    after you understand a programming language learning another language is just a matter of want.
    I am in relearning process, sorry if i make a mistake
  • [red]
    : I'M just 23 to start, but I've been into programming since my early
    : teens and I'M still no good. I first got into C++ because I wanted
    : to learn how to make video games. Not that that's no longer an
    : issue, but now I just want a job that's not in a factory. I'M now
    : trying to learn C#, but just like C++, once I get so far into
    : learning, things start to get to confusing. I can get basic
    : input/output, if/else statements, loops, you know, the simple stuff.
    : But beyond that, I get stuck. I'M a single parent so going back to
    : School isn't really an option. Is there any way I can learn to
    : program? Am I learning on the wrong languages? And is there anyway I
    : could get a job programming without a degree? Thanks for any and all
    : replies.
    :
    [/red]
    What languages have you been programming in thus far?


Sign In or Register to comment.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Categories