best educational institution for game programming degree? - Programmers Heaven

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Categories

Welcome to the new platform of Programmer's Heaven! We apologize for the inconvenience caused, if you visited us from a broken link of the previous version. The main reason to move to a new platform is to provide more effective and collaborative experience to you all. Please feel free to experience the new platform and use its exciting features. Contact us for any issue that you need to get clarified. We are more than happy to help you.

best educational institution for game programming degree?

I'm trying to help my son learn more about his options in the way of an education in game programming.

Can anyone suggest some "accepted" institutions for game programming? We are tending to shy away from online programs, but if there are some that are accredited and "accepted" in the gaming world, we would be interested in hearing about them.

My son is interested in the programming end of gaming, not the graphics.

Suggestions?

Thank you in advance for your responses!


«1

Comments

  • gautamgautam Posts: 642Member
    [b][red]This message was edited by gautam at 2005-11-10 23:58:11[/red][/b][hr]
    Hi,

    You might want to look into Full Sail. There are a few degrees in University of Florida or CMU (US), there are a few in UK universities as well. But all uni apart a CS degree + game demos holds a lot more strength than just a games degree. Yeah there are a few very boring and dry subjects in CS like software engineering, project estimation and crap like that but are pertinent to any area of software development including games development. But in the end, in the game industry the passion for making games is also evaluated which is generally demonstrated by making 2d/3d games or demos.

    This is good starting point : -
    http://www.gamedev.net/reference/start_here/

    I myself am a Bachelors in Mechanical Engineer working in the game industry and doing a Masters in Information Technology. Every company wants to see some demos done in my part time when I apply or I have had to write a complete game as part of my interview process. No one really bothered about my degree and they don't now either.




    : I'm trying to help my son learn more about his options in the way of an education in game programming.
    :
    : Can anyone suggest some "accepted" institutions for game programming? We are tending to shy away from online programs, but if there are some that are accredited and "accepted" in the gaming world, we would be interested in hearing about them.
    :
    : My son is interested in the programming end of gaming, not the graphics.
    :
    : Suggestions?
    :
    : Thank you in advance for your responses!
    :
    :
    :



  • amirekamirek Posts: 6Member
    : [b][red]This message was edited by gautam at 2005-11-10 23:58:11[/red][/b][hr]
    : Hi,
    :
    : You might want to look into Full Sail. There are a few degrees in University of Florida or CMU (US), there are a few in UK universities as well. But all uni apart a CS degree + game demos holds a lot more strength than just a games degree. Yeah there are a few very boring and dry subjects in CS like software engineering, project estimation and crap like that but are pertinent to any area of software development including games development. But in the end, in the game industry the passion for making games is also evaluated which is generally demonstrated by making 2d/3d games or demos.
    :
    : This is good starting point : -
    : http://www.gamedev.net/reference/start_here/
    :
    : I myself am a Bachelors in Mechanical Engineer working in the game industry and doing a Masters in Information Technology. Every company wants to see some demos done in my part time when I apply or I have had to write a complete game as part of my interview process. No one really bothered about my degree and they don't now either.
    :
    :
    :
    :
    : : I'm trying to help my son learn more about his options in the way of an education in game programming.
    : :
    : : Can anyone suggest some "accepted" institutions for game programming? We are tending to shy away from online programs, but if there are some that are accredited and "accepted" in the gaming world, we would be interested in hearing about them.
    : :
    : : My son is interested in the programming end of gaming, not the graphics.
    : :
    : : Suggestions?
    : :
    : : Thank you in advance for your responses!
    : :
    : :
    : :
    :
    :
    :
    :

  • amirekamirek Posts: 6Member
    : : [b][red]This message was edited by gautam at 2005-11-10 23:58:11

    Thank you for taking the time to respond to my questions. I can understand the importance of actually making games for one's "portfolio" when applying for a career in the gaming industry, and can also comprehend that an excellent game designer/creator might have his "credentials" overlooked if they are good enough. I am concerned, however, that in the event my son is NOT hired by a gaming concern, that he should have a degree that will not be overly scrutinized so that he can find work in some other capacity, possibly related to his field.

    BTW, the link you provided didn't work. Can you provide another?

    I have another question for you, if you don't mind... I'm not quite sure I understand game programming. My son is saying he is interested in coding, not so much the graphics end of creating games. Is there any future for him if he does not have the skill to create the graphics, or isn't a good artist? Can someone do programming without getting involved in the graphics end? If not, should I encourage him to work more on his 2D/3D skills, or am I better off encouraging him to find another field of interest (which I'm sure will still involve programming of some kind)?

    I sincerely appreciate that you have taken the time to answer my questions! I will look into Full Sail and the Univ. of Florida or CMU (US).

    --
    A concerned but supportive mom :)



    : : You might want to look into Full Sail. There are a few degrees in University of Florida or CMU (US), there are a few in UK universities as well. But all uni apart a CS degree + game demos holds a lot more strength than just a games degree. Yeah there are a few very boring and dry subjects in CS like software engineering, project estimation and crap like that but are pertinent to any area of software development including games development. But in the end, in the game industry the passion for making games is also evaluated which is generally demonstrated by making 2d/3d games or demos.
    : :
    : : This is good starting point : -
    : : http://www.gamedev.net/reference/start_here/
    : :
    : : I myself am a Bachelors in Mechanical Engineer working in the game industry and doing a Masters in Information Technology. Every company wants to see some demos done in my part time when I apply or I have had to write a complete game as part of my interview process. No one really bothered about my degree and they don't now either.

  • gautamgautam Posts: 642Member
    Funny, the link works for me. It might have been down. Try again.

    You might want to look around these sites as well.
    Make sure you read everything you can find in these sites as these are some of the best out there. Actually I think these are the only ones really relevant out there.

    http://www.gamedev.net
    http://www.igda.org/breakingin/

    And especially read everything in this one, you may find it blunt and could be a little dejecting, but its pretty close to the truth - but saying that apart, with hard work its possible to do well in this industry as well. And don't go by bad quality of life, its the same in all industry as far as I have seen.
    http://www.sloperama.com/

    Well generally having a CS degree will get you into any field of software industry, not just games. However you won't get to design games until you are experienced enough in a company. Well although you don't need to know how to do modelling/art work etc to be a coder, he would at least have to know a few things about graphics etc which he will eventually learn once into making games. You don't have to have excelent graphics skills as thats best left to professional artist, but you do need to understand it. For eg:- I can't model/do art work at all, but I can manage to work with the softwares they use and understand it to comprehend what they are telling me. And I am just a mere coder :). To make it simple its like cooking where you know what ingredients will do what and what effects it can have, but you don't necessarily need to know how to make the ingredients.

    Just to be clear, writing any software is also not just coding. lot of work goes into planning, design, budgeting etc.

    : : : [b][red]This message was edited by gautam at 2005-11-10 23:58:11
    :
    : Thank you for taking the time to respond to my questions. I can understand the importance of actually making games for one's "portfolio" when applying for a career in the gaming industry, and can also comprehend that an excellent game designer/creator might have his "credentials" overlooked if they are good enough. I am concerned, however, that in the event my son is NOT hired by a gaming concern, that he should have a degree that will not be overly scrutinized so that he can find work in some other capacity, possibly related to his field.
    :
    : BTW, the link you provided didn't work. Can you provide another?
    :
    : I have another question for you, if you don't mind... I'm not quite sure I understand game programming. My son is saying he is interested in coding, not so much the graphics end of creating games. Is there any future for him if he does not have the skill to create the graphics, or isn't a good artist? Can someone do programming without getting involved in the graphics end? If not, should I encourage him to work more on his 2D/3D skills, or am I better off encouraging him to find another field of interest (which I'm sure will still involve programming of some kind)?
    :
    : I sincerely appreciate that you have taken the time to answer my questions! I will look into Full Sail and the Univ. of Florida or CMU (US).
    :
    : --
    : A concerned but supportive mom :)
    :
    :
    :
    : : : You might want to look into Full Sail. There are a few degrees in University of Florida or CMU (US), there are a few in UK universities as well. But all uni apart a CS degree + game demos holds a lot more strength than just a games degree. Yeah there are a few very boring and dry subjects in CS like software engineering, project estimation and crap like that but are pertinent to any area of software development including games development. But in the end, in the game industry the passion for making games is also evaluated which is generally demonstrated by making 2d/3d games or demos.
    : : :
    : : : This is good starting point : -
    : : : http://www.gamedev.net/reference/start_here/
    : : :
    : : : I myself am a Bachelors in Mechanical Engineer working in the game industry and doing a Masters in Information Technology. Every company wants to see some demos done in my part time when I apply or I have had to write a complete game as part of my interview process. No one really bothered about my degree and they don't now either.
    :
    :

  • amirekamirek Posts: 6Member
    : Funny, the link works for me. It might have been down. Try again.

    Yes, it must have been down at the time, because now I can access it fine. I've copied your e-mails along with the links and I e-mailed them to my son. I think he will find a lot of useful information in what you've had to say and in the links as well. I find the subject of gaming fascinating, and I'm not even a "gamer". LOL!

    I sincerely appreciate your suggestions and advice. I think that your words will make more of an impression on my son than anything I could tell him. It's always better to hear things from someone who knows what they're talking about, and Mom doesn't know anything, as you well know!

    I visited the college sites you suggested, and found a few more on the internet. It seems that more and more colleges are offering game development, game design, and game programming degrees every day.

    Do you think there is any benefit to taking online courses? They are horribly expensive, but it makes more sense than sending my son to another state, which would cost even more. DeVry says they will offer a gaming degree online beginning in March of next year. Are they considered a good school, in your opinion?

    I guess that's all the questions I have. Again, thank you for taking the time to reply! I value your input!

    --
    Leslie Ray


  • gautamgautam Posts: 642Member
    Don't have to be a gamer to find it interesting. It just has a little more eye candy than the boring application software jobs.

    As long as time and effort is put into something and there is an interest to learn, anything is worthwhile. In the game industry your skills more than your degree matters. The only problem with online stuff is many a times you don't have access to a lecturer or someone who can help you with assignment question and stuff and that can stop you from advancing. Secondly its a little more harder to keep the interest going with online course. Well thats my personal opinion. They may vary.

    I don't know much about Devry or online education. Being a self taught programmer/game programmer I wouldn't really be able to answer if one university is better than the other. You might want to contact a few students of those universities to get a better idea. Ideally it would be best to mail the universities and see what kind of response you get and also look at the curriculum. Also if you are in the US and your city has a local IGDA chapter -> look it up in www.igda.org, make sure you go there as well as a lot of game programmers will visit it and they are generally very approachable. And its open to the public and there is no charge to go to it. They will give you a much better idea of the schools as some of them have lecturers from nearby game companies or who have good experience in game development.

    And from my experience, getting a job in this industry is more about networking and skills rather than a degree. So as long you want to learn and keep improving there is always good jobs around.

    : : Funny, the link works for me. It might have been down. Try again.
    :
    : Yes, it must have been down at the time, because now I can access it fine. I've copied your e-mails along with the links and I e-mailed them to my son. I think he will find a lot of useful information in what you've had to say and in the links as well. I find the subject of gaming fascinating, and I'm not even a "gamer". LOL!
    :
    : I sincerely appreciate your suggestions and advice. I think that your words will make more of an impression on my son than anything I could tell him. It's always better to hear things from someone who knows what they're talking about, and Mom doesn't know anything, as you well know!
    :
    : I visited the college sites you suggested, and found a few more on the internet. It seems that more and more colleges are offering game development, game design, and game programming degrees every day.
    :
    : Do you think there is any benefit to taking online courses? They are horribly expensive, but it makes more sense than sending my son to another state, which would cost even more. DeVry says they will offer a gaming degree online beginning in March of next year. Are they considered a good school, in your opinion?
    :
    : I guess that's all the questions I have. Again, thank you for taking the time to reply! I value your input!
    :
    : --
    : Leslie Ray
    :
    :
    :

  • amirekamirek Posts: 6Member
    : Don't have to be a gamer to find it interesting. It just has a little more eye candy than the boring application software jobs.

    No doubt! :)

    : As long as time and effort is put into something and there is an interest to learn, anything is worthwhile. In the game industry your skills more than your degree matters. The only problem with online stuff is many a times you don't have access to a lecturer or someone who can help you with assignment question and stuff and that can stop you from advancing. Secondly its a little more harder to keep the interest going with online course. Well thats my personal opinion. They may vary.

    I can see that what you're saying is probably true. You'd have to be pretty self-motivated to get much from the online courses.

    : I don't know much about Devry or online education. Being a self taught programmer/game programmer I wouldn't really be able to answer if one university is better than the other. You might want to contact a few students of those universities to get a better idea. Ideally it would be best to mail the universities and see what kind of response you get and also look at the curriculum. Also if you are in the US and your city has a local IGDA chapter -> look it up in www.igda.org, make sure you go there as well as a lot of game programmers will visit it and they are generally very approachable. And its open to the public and there is no charge to go to it. They will give you a much better idea of the schools as some of them have lecturers from nearby game companies or who have good experience in game development.

    I may do as you suggest, and ask the university to let me speak to some graduates from their gaming program. They would be able to tell me if the degree has been any kind of an influence on their ability to obtain jobs. I will check to see if there is a local chapter of the IGDA. I think that would be a good place for my son to start.

    : And from my experience, getting a job in this industry is more about networking and skills rather than a degree. So as long you want to learn and keep improving there is always good jobs around.

    I'm sure you're right. As with any job, your amibition and drive will have a lot to do with whether you land it or not.

    Thank you for your assistance!!!!

    --
    Leslie Ray

  • CyGuyCyGuy Posts: 312Member
    [b][red]This message was edited by CyGuy at 2005-11-19 17:55:48[/red][/b][hr]
    : I'm trying to help my son learn more about his options in the way of an education in game programming.
    :
    : Can anyone suggest some "accepted" institutions for game programming? We are tending to shy away from online programs, but if there are some that are accredited and "accepted" in the gaming world, we would be interested in hearing about them.
    :
    : My son is interested in the programming end of gaming, not the graphics.
    :
    : Suggestions?
    :
    : Thank you in advance for your responses!
    :
    :
    :
    [blue]hi, sorry for the delayed response. I am a student in Texas. I like games, however often I find myself no longer interested. I have, sort of, grown out of video games. A good game is like a movie; It must fit a genre, follow a storyline, and display characteristics of suspense and irony. The best part of a good game these days is seeing the outcome.

    There is something for everyone in the industry. Graphic Arts is a major factor in the end result. You must also consider sound, and interaction... Multimedia. If your son excels in mathematics, I would recomend Computer Science or Information Systems. They both offer the benefit of programming. Electrical Engineering may also be a consideration; many graduates in this field go on to be excellent programmers.

    As for any particular school, MIT boasts the brightest of minds; they invented the mouse. Most business colleges offer some sort of computer science program and multimedia design, and many engineering colleges that offer electrical engineering degrees are branching toward computer information/engineering. In texas there is University of Texas "Longhorns"; some of thier people made up Jimmy Neutron, a popular cartoon.

    Consider the strengths and intrests, artsy people can pursue graphic design, a people person could do multimedia and maybe computer science, wheras a math person should persue the engineering degree. Believe it or not there are more artists that work on a game than programmers, furthermore the best artists must still know programming to work well as a designers.[/blue]



  • amirekamirek Posts: 6Member
    : [b][red]This message was edited by CyGuy at 2005-11-19 17:55:48[/red][/b][hr]

    : [blue]hi, sorry for the delayed response. I am a student in Texas. I like games, however often I find myself no longer interested. I have, sort of, grown out of video games. A good game is like a movie; It must fit a genre, follow a storyline, and display characteristics of suspense and irony. The best part of a good game these days is seeing the outcome.


    I agree. My son has already designed a couple of games, and his friends love them. He's very "into" gaming, and has an excellent imagination. What strikes me as unique is the amount of "detail" he puts into the games he creates. They are very intricate. But, he's not a great artist. He does have artistic talent, but needs to work more on it. His art teacher raves about his skill, but I think he is a bit "lazy" when it comes to his art. (In other words, if he were to put more effort into it, he could be fantastic.) It's possible he could learn to use the graphics programs (3D) to create characters, etc., though.


    : There is something for everyone in the industry. Graphic Arts is a major factor in the end result. You must also consider sound, and interaction... Multimedia. If your son excels in mathematics, I would recomend Computer Science or Information Systems. They both offer the benefit of programming. Electrical Engineering may also be a consideration; many graduates in this field go on to be excellent programmers.


    My son does excel at math, but he feels engineering is "boring". He is a very outdoing person with a crazy sense of humor and wonderful imagination. I've encouraged him to obtain a degree in Computer Science for the time being, and to pursue his gaming skills by taking online courses and designing games on the side, in order to compile a portfolio. My thinking is that once he has his BA or BS degree in hand, he can get a Masters in Game Development, if that's what he decides to do.


    : As for any particular school, MIT boasts the brightest of minds; they invented the mouse. Most business colleges offer some sort of computer science program and multimedia design, and many engineering colleges that offer electrical engineering degrees are branching toward computer information/engineering. In texas there is University of Texas "Longhorns"; some of thier people made up Jimmy Neutron, a popular cartoon.
    :
    : Consider the strengths and intrests, artsy people can pursue graphic design, a people person could do multimedia and maybe computer science, wheras a math person should persue the engineering degree. Believe it or not there are more artists that work on a game than programmers, furthermore the best artists must still know programming to work well as a designers.[/blue]
    :


    I figured as much. But, I think it could work the other way around, to where someone with excellent programming skills could learn the "artsy" end if they have talent and motivation. I am trying to encourage my son in this vein.

    Thank you for your post. I really appreciate the input I'm receiving, as it is helping me to guide my son towards a field of study that will accomplish both his needs and his "wants". :)


  • addyk2004addyk2004 Posts: 60Member
    : : : [b][red]This message was edited by gautam at 2005-11-10 23:58:11
    :
    : Thank you for taking the time to respond to my questions. I can understand the importance of actually making games for one's "portfolio" when applying for a career in the gaming industry, and can also comprehend that an excellent game designer/creator might have his "credentials" overlooked if they are good enough. I am concerned, however, that in the event my son is NOT hired by a gaming concern, that he should have a degree that will not be overly scrutinized so that he can find work in some other capacity, possibly related to his field.
    :
    : BTW, the link you provided didn't work. Can you provide another?
    :
    : I have another question for you, if you don't mind... I'm not quite sure I understand game programming. My son is saying he is interested in coding, not so much the graphics end of creating games. Is there any future for him if he does not have the skill to create the graphics, or isn't a good artist? Can someone do programming without getting involved in the graphics end? If not, should I encourage him to work more on his 2D/3D skills, or am I better off encouraging him to find another field of interest (which I'm sure will still involve programming of some kind)?
    :
    : I sincerely appreciate that you have taken the time to answer my questions! I will look into Full Sail and the Univ. of Florida or CMU (US).
    :
    : --
    : A concerned but supportive mom :)
    :
    :
    :
    : : : You might want to look into Full Sail. There are a few degrees in University of Florida or CMU (US), there are a few in UK universities as well. But all uni apart a CS degree + game demos holds a lot more strength than just a games degree. Yeah there are a few very boring and dry subjects in CS like software engineering, project estimation and crap like that but are pertinent to any area of software development including games development. But in the end, in the game industry the passion for making games is also evaluated which is generally demonstrated by making 2d/3d games or demos.
    : : :
    : : : This is good starting point : -
    : : : http://www.gamedev.net/reference/start_here/
    : : :
    : : : I myself am a Bachelors in Mechanical Engineer working in the game industry and doing a Masters in Information Technology. Every company wants to see some demos done in my part time when I apply or I have had to write a complete game as part of my interview process. No one really bothered about my degree and they don't now either.
    :
    :
    [/b]
    [blue]
    You don't really have to be a painter or have too many inclinations to graphics to make a game. Surely if your son creates the graphics the game might not [green]"look"[/green] like one that has a very good artist, but maybe he has a friend [grey](preferably a girl :P, (because they tend to do very fine artwork, and I mean it))[/grey] that knows how to draw very well, and they can both work on this project, [grey](about all the DOS little games that I've seen are having at least to people in the Credits area coder&artist)[/grey].
    I am now curently making 2D DOS games [grey](I know they are a little out of date, but as long as there's DOS around and DOS emulators I will allways work on them)[/grey] and I think that they are very easy to make. But If your son is interrested in developing 3D games he should get or create an engine first. I recently learnt about a site that explains how to make an OpenGL engine [grey](OpenGL is a very good interface to your program, and it's cross-platform :) )[/grey]:
    http://www.gamedev.net/reference/programming/features/enginuity1/
    Hope I've been of any help, and if not, I am sorry.
    [/blue]
    [code][blue][size=5]AddyK[/size] (addyk2004), E-mail: addyk2003@flash.ro (I know it should be 2004)[/blue][/code]

«1
Sign In or Register to comment.