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3d game engine for beginners

Hehe I finished my game! Check it out at geocities.com/platinum_games.

My next task is to learn a 3d game engine, and make a game with it. The problem is, I don't know enough about them to choose the best one to learn. Does anyone here know of a good one to learn that isn't too complex? I found one called Genesis3D, but I dont know if that is too complex or not. Any advice is appreciated.



"It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
-Wannabean333 (*********)

Comments

  • ziggwarthziggwarth Posts: 50Member
    Hey.

    I checked out your game, Great work!

    About the game engine, why don't you try to create one from scratch? :) in Direct3d or OpenGL or something?
    If you are looking for OpenGL tutorials, check out http://nehe.gamedev.net/ . The tutorials there are covering everything from setting up OpenGL to loading a 3d world from a file to loading models, animation, texturing, shadows, lighting, everything!

    This is of course just a suggestion. :)
  • Wannabean333Wannabean333 Posts: 85Member
    the NeHe site looks pretty good. One question though- Is OpenGL easier to learn than Direct3D?

    I'm kinda scared to try and write a 3D engine, because I only know very basic c++ and I'm not sure how much math I should know. I'm taking pre-cal this year (i'm in high school) but is that enough to write a good engine? I don't know where to turn for help except for at this forum (Of all the people I know, only one knows what c++ is), so it would probably take a long time to do it.

    I'm still looking for engines, by the way.

    "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    -Wannabean333 (*********)

  • ziggwarthziggwarth Posts: 50Member
    [b][red]This message was edited by ziggwarth at 2003-9-1 17:1:38[/red][/b][hr]
    : the NeHe site looks pretty good. One question though- Is OpenGL easier to learn than Direct3D?
    :
    : I'm kinda scared to try and write a 3D engine, because I only know very basic c++ and I'm not sure how much math I should know. I'm taking pre-cal this year (i'm in high school) but is that enough to write a good engine? I don't know where to turn for help except for at this forum (Of all the people I know, only one knows what c++ is), so it would probably take a long time to do it.
    :
    : I'm still looking for engines, by the way.
    :
    : "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    : -Wannabean333 (*********)


    Well, I haven't very much experience in 3d programming, but from the little experience I have, OpenGL seems a little easier (but that may just be me :))
    To program a 3d engine, you need to be pretty good in math, for use in, for example collision detection, physics, angles, and stuff like that.
    A very good book about 3d programming is "Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus", by Andr LaMothe. That book is primarily about Direct3d, but he also covers almost all the math you need to program a 3d engine, from scratch. He also covers physics, AI, directdraw, directsound, directinput, and some more.
    I would guess that if you know the basics in C++ (pointers, functions, file i/o, and of course a little windows programming) then I would guess that if you got that book, or the NeHe tutorials, you would be able to create a finished 3d engine. Of course, that's just my guess :)

    Personally, I would love to create a 3d engine myself, but I just can't stand the thought of having to create models and stuff like that myself :)

    If you decide to use a "pre-made" 3d engine, I totally understand that, because creating a complete 3d engine is a huge job.
    Let me know what will do :)

    Greetings from Ziggwarth

    EDIT:
    About your first question: because you already have used DirectDraw (in your game), and directsound, and directinput (if you did use that), it may be easier for you to use Direct3d instead of opengl, as you are already familiar with directX. I don't know
  • Wannabean333Wannabean333 Posts: 85Member
    I used a 2D game engine, which was not written by me, in my other game. I am still looking for one, no rush or anything, but if anyone here sees one, post the name and web address here for me please. Don't worry im not mooching, I'm looking too :-)



    "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    -Wannabean333 (*********)

  • cignox1cignox1 Posts: 33Member
    : the NeHe site looks pretty good. One question though- Is OpenGL easier to learn than Direct3D?
    :
    : I'm kinda scared to try and write a 3D engine, because I only know very basic c++ and I'm not sure how much math I should know. I'm taking pre-cal this year (i'm in high school) but is that enough to write a good engine? I don't know where to turn for help except for at this forum (Of all the people I know, only one knows what c++ is), so it would probably take a long time to do it.
    :
    : I'm still looking for engines, by the way.
    :
    : "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    : -Wannabean333 (*********)
    :
    :

    If you don't know Gamedev.net, go there and look for what you need. I guess you will find it.
    From my little experience, OpenGl is simpler to understand than Direct3D... I Used DirectX for a while, then I tried OGL and I'm pretty sure I won't turn back to DX. OGL does not use COM Interfaces and the code looks better (from my own point of view).
    On the other side, DirectX is updated frequently by MS, and this means that it supports in a standard way the new features without using proprietary extensions (but I'm not really sure about this). In addition, Direct3D gives a software emulation for each features, good for testing when your graphic hardware does not support some of them. Choosing between the two is a question of taste, I think.
    For the 3D graphic you will need to know calculus and, most important, linear algebra (matrices, vectors). In fact, even from the first steps you will need to set some transformation matrices, multiply them with vertices, work with coordinates and so on. Building a graphical engine is a giant work (I say this because I spent the last three or four years with this... I began with DX7, then I lost everything, then I restarted, then DX8 apported some changes and I redesigned it. Now I begin with OGL...).
    Good luck!
  • Wannabean333Wannabean333 Posts: 85Member
    : If you don't know Gamedev.net, go there and look for what you need. I guess you will find it.
    : From my little experience, OpenGl is simpler to understand than Direct3D... I Used DirectX for a while, then I tried OGL and I'm pretty sure I won't turn back to DX. OGL does not use COM Interfaces and the code looks better (from my own point of view).
    : On the other side, DirectX is updated frequently by MS, and this means that it supports in a standard way the new features without using proprietary extensions (but I'm not really sure about this). In addition, Direct3D gives a software emulation for each features, good for testing when your graphic hardware does not support some of them. Choosing between the two is a question of taste, I think.
    : For the 3D graphic you will need to know calculus and, most important, linear algebra (matrices, vectors). In fact, even from the first steps you will need to set some transformation matrices, multiply them with vertices, work with coordinates and so on. Building a graphical engine is a giant work (I say this because I spent the last three or four years with this... I began with DX7, then I lost everything, then I restarted, then DX8 apported some changes and I redesigned it. Now I begin with OGL...).
    : Good luck!
    :

    I've heard of Gamedev.net. Thanks for letting me know what math it takes. Wow you spent 3 to 4 years.... there's no way i could do that. I'm still wondering if theres a "learner" engine out there. You know, a simple one with less features but lots of documentaion. If anyone here knows of one please tell me about it.


    "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    -Wannabean333 (*********)

  • cignox1cignox1 Posts: 33Member
    : I've heard of Gamedev.net. Thanks for letting me know what math it takes. Wow you spent 3 to 4 years.... there's no way i could do that. I'm still wondering if theres a "learner" engine out there. You know, a simple one with less features but lots of documentaion. If anyone here knows of one please tell me about it.
    :
    :
    : "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    : -Wannabean333 (*********)
    :
    :

    I don't know the graphic engines you could use to learn... But you talked about Genesis3D and it seemed to be nice (even if a bit old: is there a new version?). I know that source code of Quake and Quake2 are downloadable for free from www.idsoftware.com. Since Quake don't use DX or OGL, it should be a good choice for learning pourposes, but as you know, it is too old for building games.
    (by the way, I spent 3/4 years, but this does not mean that you will spend this long time. If you have enaught spare time, and if you have good mathematical skills, you are able to write a basic engine in 10-12 months, working alone...)
  • korkor Posts: 198Member
    : : the NeHe site looks pretty good. One question though- Is OpenGL easier to learn than Direct3D?
    : :
    : : I'm kinda scared to try and write a 3D engine, because I only know very basic c++ and I'm not sure how much math I should know. I'm taking pre-cal this year (i'm in high school) but is that enough to write a good engine? I don't know where to turn for help except for at this forum (Of all the people I know, only one knows what c++ is), so it would probably take a long time to do it.
    : :
    : : I'm still looking for engines, by the way.
    : :
    : : "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    : : -Wannabean333 (*********)
    : :
    : :
    :
    : If you don't know Gamedev.net, go there and look for what you need. I guess you will find it.
    : From my little experience, OpenGl is simpler to understand than Direct3D... I Used DirectX for a while, then I tried OGL and I'm pretty sure I won't turn back to DX. OGL does not use COM Interfaces and the code looks better (from my own point of view).
    : On the other side, DirectX is updated frequently by MS, and this means that it supports in a standard way the new features without using proprietary extensions (but I'm not really sure about this). In addition, Direct3D gives a software emulation for each features, good for testing when your graphic hardware does not support some of them. Choosing between the two is a question of taste, I think.
    : For the 3D graphic you will need to know calculus and, most important, linear algebra (matrices, vectors). In fact, even from the first steps you will need to set some transformation matrices, multiply them with vertices, work with coordinates and so on. Building a graphical engine is a giant work (I say this because I spent the last three or four years with this... I began with DX7, then I lost everything, then I restarted, then DX8 apported some changes and I redesigned it. Now I begin with OGL...).
    : Good luck!
    :
    Calculus? Granted it may help make some things, like curves, easier, but I can't think of a single reason it's absolutely required.
  • Wannabean333Wannabean333 Posts: 85Member
    I have decided that it would be a good idea to try and make a simple 3d graphics engine. Im getting an opengl book from a friend and I will be starting it soon. However, I don't know the parts of a 3d engine. If anyone would be so kind as to list a bunch of them, that would be great. I know the book will talk a little bit about it, but I would like to try and figure out what I need.

    thanks

    "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    -Wannabean333 (*********)

  • treshrtreshr Posts: 326Member
    Why don't you use SDL.
    It's the same as DirectX and OpenGL, but if you program it right, you can even compile your games for Linux, MacOS, and Windows!

    Check this out: http://www.libsdl.org/index.php

    --=][tReShR][=--

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