Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Categories

Oldtime assembly programmers

Any real oldtime assembly programmers out there? I'd like to hear from you. I wrote the cross-assembler for the Control Data 1604/3600 back in 1962, plus most of the hardware drivers for the 3600. The 3600 was state of the art, but child's play compared with the newer machines. I'm too old to screw around with programming any more, but I'd sure like to play with the new 64-bit computers- especially the one from Intel. That architecture looks awesome.
Jackw5

Comments

  • smaffysmaffy Member Posts: 20
    : Any real oldtime assembly programmers out there? I'd like to hear from you. I wrote the cross-assembler for the Control Data 1604/3600 back in 1962, plus most of the hardware drivers for the 3600. The 3600 was state of the art, but child's play compared with the newer machines. I'm too old to screw around with programming any more, but I'd sure like to play with the new 64-bit computers- especially the one from Intel. That architecture looks awesome.
    : Jackw5
    :

    1964?! i would love to read some about those microprocessors! i have just been coding for 80x86-processors and hc11 (and ive read some very large texts about other cpu's too..) it would be wonderful to see the progress of our dear computors :) anway, the processor you are thinking of from intel is named Itanium, but they dosnt exist at the odinary market, YET. I cant wait until they release it :))

    nowdays, most assembly folks tend to learn assembly from school or by themself (as me, i started when i was 13 years old, before i knew any other computor language, and i am proud for that!)..
  • Jackw5Jackw5 Member Posts: 3
    : : Any real oldtime assembly programmers out there? I'd like to hear from you. I wrote the cross-assembler for the Control Data 1604/3600 back in 1962, plus most of the hardware drivers for the 3600. The 3600 was state of the art, but child's play compared with the newer machines. I'm too old to screw around with programming any more, but I'd sure like to play with the new 64-bit computers- especially the one from Intel. That architecture looks awesome.
    : : Jackw5
    : :
    :
    : 1964?! i would love to read some about those microprocessors! i have just been coding for 80x86-processors and hc11 (and ive read some very large texts about other cpu's too..) it would be wonderful to see the progress of our dear computors :) anway, the processor you are thinking of from intel is named Itanium, but they dosnt exist at the odinary market, YET. I cant wait until they release it :))
    :
    : nowdays, most assembly folks tend to learn assembly from school or by themself (as me, i started when i was 13 years old, before i knew any other computor language, and i am proud for that!)..
    :

  • Jackw5Jackw5 Member Posts: 3
    The Control Data 3600 was a huge mainframe computer that required a large air-conditioned room. It cost $5,000,000 and came with a card reader, a printer, a paper tape reader, a couple of magnetic tape drives one 36K memory bank (8 feet long, 4 feet wide and 6 feet high). Additional memory banks (up to 7) cost $500,000 each. There were no hard drives, jut magnetic tape. The computer would process 1,000,000 instructions a second. We programmed it by filling out coding sheets (in assembler, Fortran or Basic), had them keypunched, submitted the card deck to the control desk and waited (usually) 24 hours for the results. Any error messages were likely to be like "error on line 36". Then we corrected the errors, had the corrections keypunched, and went through the whole process again. In those days programming took a LOT of patience, but it was still fun.
    Jackw5

    : : : Any real oldtime assembly programmers out there? I'd like to hear from you. I wrote the cross-assembler for the Control Data 1604/3600 back in 1962, plus most of the hardware drivers for the 3600. The 3600 was state of the art, but child's play compared with the newer machines. I'm too old to screw around with programming any more, but I'd sure like to play with the new 64-bit computers- especially the one from Intel. That architecture looks awesome.
    : : : Jackw5
    : : :
    : :
    : : 1964?! i would love to read some about those microprocessors! i have just been coding for 80x86-processors and hc11 (and ive read some very large texts about other cpu's too..) it would be wonderful to see the progress of our dear computors :) anway, the processor you are thinking of from intel is named Itanium, but they dosnt exist at the odinary market, YET. I cant wait until they release it :))
    : :
    : : nowdays, most assembly folks tend to learn assembly from school or by themself (as me, i started when i was 13 years old, before i knew any other computor language, and i am proud for that!)..
    : :
    :
    :

  • dldavisdldavis Member Posts: 1
    : The Control Data 3600 was a huge mainframe computer that required a large air-conditioned room. It cost $5,000,000 and came with a card reader, a printer, a paper tape reader, a couple of magnetic tape drives one 36K memory bank (8 feet long, 4 feet wide and 6 feet high). Additional memory banks (up to 7) cost $500,000 each. There were no hard drives, jut magnetic tape. The computer would process 1,000,000 instructions a second. We programmed it by filling out coding sheets (in assembler, Fortran or Basic), had them keypunched, submitted the card deck to the control desk and waited (usually) 24 hours for the results. Any error messages were likely to be like "error on line 36". Then we corrected the errors, had the corrections keypunched, and went through the whole process again. In those days programming took a LOT of patience, but it was still fun.
    : Jackw5
    :
    Sounds like the Sigma V computer I worked on in the the Air Force during the early 80's. It was a large main frame in a large air conditioned room. Card reader, card punch, line printer, paper tape reader, teletype, core memory(64k x 32 bits) and a large 20 inch 20 surface hard disk with hydraulic read/write heads.
    I learned assembly by writting programs on paper, converting them to hex and then keying them in through the toggle switches on the front panel. I wrote a crude floating point program using this method.

    The main purpose of the system was to simulate radar returns for air traffic controller training. The air traffic simulation program was the only program that anyone there knew how to use. I eventually came across a stack of punch cards that had the original operating system, including fortran.

    After loading it, things got a lot easier to use. I wrote my first and last fortran program on it, to play blackjack. That was the good ol days, just before PCs. I learned a lot, playing with that system.
  • Chris BrownChris Brown USAMember Posts: 4,624 ✭✭

    __ / http://forcoder.org / free ebooks and video tutorials about [ Visual Basic .NET Swift Python Objective-C Scratch Ruby R C MATLAB Visual Basic Delphi Assembly JavaScript C# PL/SQL Java PHP Perl C++ Go SAS D Apex Scheme VBScript Transact-SQL ABAP Rust Bash Julia LabVIEW Erlang FoxPro F# Lisp ML Lua Logo Hack Scala Kotlin Fortran Prolog Alice Clojure Awk Crystal Ada COBOL Dart ] ____

Sign In or Register to comment.